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Care and Cleaning

RUG CARE GUIDE

  
CARING

If oriental rugs have survived centuries in comparatively good condition, it is because of careful treatment. Oriental rugs will give remarkably long service if treated with proper consideration. Their two enemies, apart from the inevitable destructive effect of wear, are moths and dampness. The former is best kept at bay by frequent moving or handling and by regular exposure to light and air. If rugs must be stored, then inspection at intervals is essential. A carpet in use is rarely in danger from moths. Certain chemical applications will render the wool inedible to moths. Dampness will in time rot the threads and destroy the fabric but it can be avoided by obvious means. If any mechanical damage is sustained such as cut or burn, the damage should be dealt with as soon as possible by a competent person for such lesions get worse very quickly. In ordinary use, quite apart from accident, the ends and sides often tend to wear and fray in which case the parts should be reovercast. Places in the middle of the carpet that are locally worn or damaged can have new knots inserted and even large holes can be restored so as to be almost as good as new, though such work is rather expensive. In carpets of lesser value, instead of new knotting, patches cut from a suitable rug can often be inserted at less cost and sometimes a serviceable small rug can be made from a larger worn one by cutting away the bad parts.

ROTATION

Frequently rotate the rug from sunny areas to the other side of the room to equalize the effect of the sun. Continuous exposure to bright hot sun rays and even indirect sunlight will cause damage to the dyed fabrics used in Oriental rugs. On bright sunny days, use window shades, shutters or heavy curtains to reduce the sun damage. Also, in terms of fading, sometimes gases and fumes (from furnaces, cooking stoves, chimneys and auto exhausts) mix with oxygen and humidity in the atmosphere to form an acid. This acid reacts on the wool and causes deterioration and discoloration. Usually faded areas are hidden by soil and will not be apparent until the surface has been cleaned. In this case, contrast of color fading could be avoided by rotating rugs from time to time to make fading or soiling uniform and by changing their places so that all parts of the rug will have a chance for equal exposure.

PADDING

Good quality padding protects the rug especially in heavily trafficked areas. The best padding is a hair or fiber filled pad with rubberized surfaces to keep the rug from moving or wrinkling. The life of an Oriental rug can be doubled with the use of a good quality pad.

HANGING

Before hanging carpets on the wall, one should be certain that the warp threads could stand the strain. Do no use nails or staples at the top of a heavy rug to hang for a long period of time. Use a strong poster holder to distribute the weight of the rug evenly.

STORING

If a rug is to be stored for a long period of time, use sheet or cloth to wrap it, but do not use an airtight plastic bag. Oriental rugs need to breathe and they will sometimes rot or mildew in a plastic bag. They could also be rolled up and kept in a chest with some paradichlorobenzene crystals, which will have to be renewed every few months. Ideally large carpets should be rolled around poles, the protruding ends of which should rest on blocks or trestles. It is advisable to let carpets lie flat on top of one another for any length of time. Do NOT store rugs in a humid, damp, warm or poorly ventilated room. This causes mildew that usually has a musty odor, discolors fabrics, and weakens them so that they fall in pieces. Never leave an Oriental rug wet. Failure to remove all of the moisture might result in mildew. Do NOT store an Oriental rug in a hot closet. The base of a rug can dry out and become brittle destroying the strength and durability of the rug.

MOTHS

Moths can cause extensive damage to Oriental rugs. Not only do moths eat the pile but they also eat the knots on the back of a rug. Moths are especially attracted to areas such as those under furniture that remain relatively undisturbed. It is quite simple to eliminate these pests and safeguard against their return. Both front and back of a carpet should be sprayed about every six months with any one of a number of available moth sprays.

CRUSHED PILE

To up-right the piles that are indented or crushed by legs of heavy furniture, brush the depressed area with a soft brush and faintly moisten the area by a spray and follow-up by brushing.

CLEANING

The beauty and life of Oriental rugs are vitally dependent on their cleanliness. Lack of maintenance will contribute to loss in the potential of investment.

VACUUMING

Never vacuum against the nap of the rug (the direction of the nap can easily be determined by running the hand across the pile from fringe to fringe). Vacuuming against the nap also presses dirt back into the rug. Never vacuum the rugs’ fringes. The continued catching of the fringe in the suction of a vacuum cleaner causes the fringes to break and tear. Sweeping with a broom will give the best result. As a general rule always vacuum with a low-level suction using a new bag.

GENERAL PROCEDURE

Always rub or brush lightly from the outer edge toward the center of the stain to prevent spreading or causing "the ring" when using solvents especially on twist rugs and pile carpets. On old, dry or stubborn stains, saturate, blot, and brush. Repeat this operation as often as necessary to remove the stain completely.

STAIN REMOVAL PACKAGE

You have to move fast which means you should keep a little box containing the following close at hand at all times: Dry cleaning fluid, Clean Cloths, White Vinegar, Mild Detergent (containing no alkalis or bleaches), Alcohol, Sponges, Clothes brush, Weak Ammonia 7% solution.

TIPS ON CLEANING UP STAINS

  1. Do it fast.

  2. Blot up all excess spill with paper towels.
    Don’t Rub.

  3. Apply antidote(s) as shown on list with a clean dry cloth, working from the edge to the center.

  4. Do not soak.

  5. Pat with paper towels. Dry with fan or hair blower.

  6. Restore pile with clothes brush.

CANDLE WAX: Place a blotter or brown paper bag over the spot. Put a hot iron over the blotter. Wait a few minutes until the wax is absorbed into the blotter. Repeat if necessary. Move the iron constantly and do not let it stay in one place.

CHEWING GUM: Press ice cubes against spot. Wait until it becomes brittle and breaks off. Use spot remover to vanish last traces. Saturate the spot with cloth soaked in vinegar or alcohol.

INK FROM BALLPOINT PEN: Saturate the spot with hairspray. Allow to dry. Brush lightly with a solution of water and vinegar.



SPOT & STAIN REMOVAL PROCEDURE
Blot after each application

Procedure A:

Detergent - Vinegar - Detergent - Water

Procedure B:

Cleaning fluids - Detergent - Water - Ammonia - Detergent -Water

Procedure C:

Detergent - Vinegar - Ammonia - Detergent - Water

Procedure D:

Detergent - Ammonia - Detergent - Water Detergent - Ammonia - Vinegar

Procedure E:

Detergent - Water

 



ALPHABETICAL STAIN TREATMENT INDEX
Match each stain with its corresponding procedure

 

Acid
Alcoholic Drink
Ammonia/Alkali
Beer
Berries
Bleach
Blood
Butter
Candy/Sugar
Carbon Black
Catsup
Charcoal
Chocolate/Cocoa
Coffee
Cooking Oil
Cosmetic
Crayon
Creme de Menthe
Dye-blue/black
Dye-Red

D
A
A
E
E
A
D
B
A
B
B
A
A
D
B
B
B
C
C
E

Egg
Excrement
Fish Slime
Fruit Juice
Furniture. Polish
Gravy
Hair Oil
Hair Spray
Hand Lotion
Ice Cream
Lacquer
Lard
Lipstick
Machine Oil
Mayonnaise
Mercurochrome
Merthiolate
Metal Polish
Milk
Mixed Drinks

B
C
B
E
B
A
B
B
B
B
B
D
A
B
B
E
E
A
A
E

Mud
Mustard
Paint
Perfume
Rust
Salad Dressing
Sauce
Shortening
Soft Drink
Soy Sauce
Starch
Tar
Tea
Tooth Paste
Urine
Varnish
Vaseline
Vomit
Washable ink
Wine

A
E
B
A
A
B
A
B
E
B
B
B
D
A
D
B
B
B
A
E

 


Please be advised that we cannot be responsible for the result of the above recommendations.

Your best bet is to take the rug to a professional rug cleaner…